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Text, Email, Phone: The Mighty Trio of Customer Communication

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Text, emails and phone calls—oh my!

These three channels are the “mighty trio” of customer communication. The key is knowing the advantages and disadvantages of each one so you can get the most out of your communication tools.

Join us for a 45-minute, interactive webinar covering the pros and cons of phone calls, emails and texts and how to combine them for maximum impact.

Our host, Keith Hitchcock, was joined by Carlene Reyes, one of our resident writers and Textperts here at Zipwhip. You may have seen Carlene’s work on our blog! She writes about the latest trends in business communication and how to use texting to increase customer engagement and improve team workflows.

Here’s what you’ll learn in this webinar:

  • The pros and cons of texts, phone calls and emails
  • Consumer preferences for each medium
  • How businesses across industries are leveraging the mighty trio
  • Examples to help you learn how to use texts, calls and emails in harmony
  • And more!

Ready to master the mighty trio?

Invite your team and practice deciphering how and when to text, call and email your customers.

Featuring

Staff Writer Carlene Reyes
Carlene Reyes
Writer & Textpert
Bill Higbee Headshot
Keith Hitchcock
Digital Content Producer

Keith Hitchcock: 

Hello, and welcome to another webinar at Zipwhip HQ here in Seattle, Washington. This is Text, Email, Phone: The Mighty Trio of Customer Communication. I’m so glad you’re joining us. My name is Keith. I’m your host. I’m digital content producer here at Zipwhip, and this Zipwhip webinar series is designed to help business professionals, like yourself, with their customer communication strategies. We offer you practical tips and tools, resources and high level though to help you with your business goals. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

This week, we’re talking about texting, email and phoning. You might already be texting your customers. Hopefully, you’re emailing and phoning, whatever you need to connect with them, and in any case, we’re hoping to give you some inspiration today. I don’t want to spend a whole lot of time introducing things. I’m going to introduce our main presenter here, Carlene Reyes, to tell us what it’s all about. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Making my entry. Hello! 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Hello, and welcome. Thanks for joining today. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Hello, everyone in webinar land. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Hey, tell us a little bit more about who you are and what you do. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yep. So, I’m Carlene. I’m a writer here at Zipwhip. I spend all of my time, all day every day, focusing on our blog and eBooks. I research and write about the texting for business face and how Zipwhip helps businesses succeed in their customer communication goals. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. Well, you are the perfect person for the role today to tell us about the mighty trio. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yes. I am a “text-pert”. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

There are some people behind the scenes that I want to mention. There are Natalie and [Rehana 00:01:37] who are moderating from the moderation cave for some of those comments or questions that we can’t respond to during the webinar. They’ll be getting to those, and maybe even tossing some helpful resources in along the way. That is the team. You’ve gotten to know us. Let us take a moment to get to know you. We do that by launching polls. Gives you a little chance to engage with us and for us to get to know you. We like this question here to help us understand you a little bit. How does your company currently text with customers. Now, you may not be texting with customers and that’s okay. There’s a little box for you, “We don’t text with customers.” We always like reading the temperature a little bit of who we’re talking to. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

I am going to close the poll, and we will take a peek. Here we go. It’s kind of a spread here. What do you think, Carlene? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. We have a lot of Zipwhip customers. Hello, and yeah. Some people who aren’t using texting for business right now, so this will be a nice little intro to that. Yeah, looks good. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. Thanks for playing. Now that we’ve all gotten to know each other just a little bit, let’s talk about what we are getting into today. If you’re new to the Go To Webinar app, it’s pretty straightforward. On your side, you should just be seeing an audio window where you can change your listening device if you want to listen on headphones instead of your laptop speaker or whatever, you can do that. Then, there’s the all important question window. Whenever you have a question or a comment, go ahead and toss that in there. We’ll do our best to answer it. There will be a live Q&A section later on where we’ll get to as many questions as we can in the time that we have left. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

By the way, this was originally conceived as a 30 minute webinar, and there might have been some materials out there that made you think it was going to be that long, and we’ve actually extended it to 45 minutes because there’s so much content that we… 

Carlene Reyes: 

A lot of good stuff to go over. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

We wanted to get to. So, if you need to take off at the half hour mark, no problem. I’m actually going to be following up with everyone with a video recording and a PDF of our slides that you’re seeing today. Just watch for that follow up email as a thank you for filling out this brief survey at the end, I’m going to be sending that email to everyone who’s registered for this. I think that’s all our housekeeping. I do want to let you know about our text line, as well. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

If you text the word “Mighty”, inspired by the title of this webinar, to this number here, (347)772-3529, we’re going to send you a bunch of links that will help you go deeper with this content. There’s some that are on our blog. There’s a link to a ultimate guide to texting your customers, which goes even deeper with how to do this texting thing, and a lot of those things, I’ll be sending via email, too. So, if you prefer texting, if you prefer email, you’re going to get it. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Lots of good stuff. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Lots of good stuff! 

Carlene Reyes: 

Lots of good stuff. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

With that, I think we’re ready for the main event, here. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Content overview. Okay. Yeah. So, this is going to be broken up into two parts. The first part will be pros and cons of each of the three communication mediums, text, phone, and email. The second part will go over Use Cases. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. 

Carlene Reyes: 

We’re going to have two from Zipwhip customers, and the last one will be a little different, some acting going on. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Got to stay tuned for that. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah, stay tuned for that! So, yeah, and really quick, just a note about the first part. Some of the pros and cons we’re about to lay out will feel a little obvious. We know that all of you know what email and phone calls are used for in a business setting, of course, but for the purpose of this lesson in our webinar, it’s important that we lay out the pros and cons so that you have better context to their strengths and weaknesses for your communication goals and how text messaging fits into the picture to supplement all of them. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yeah, this might be a good moment, in whatever kind of business you’re running, to really consider, “Should I be phoning for this interaction? Or should I be emailing? Or texting?” 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yep. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Every medium, just like you say, has its pros and cons, and we’re going to dive right in to the pros and cons of email, right? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yep. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

First. 

Carlene Reyes: 

That’s first up. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Here we go. 

Carlene Reyes: 

So the pros. Lots of info and length that you can put in an email. They’re perfect for laying out lots of information, or perhaps explaining something more complex. Email is great for that. Record keeping, when you have a lot of info to keep track of and multiple people are chiming in and replaying, it’s super helpful to have that trail of conversation for reference. Next is sending attachments. When you need to attach files like a loan application, or an updated insurance policy, emails are the way to go for that. It’s especially easier for your customers if they want to save that file directly to their computer. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Hard to attach something to a phone call. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yes. Can’t do it. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Next is marketing. Of course email marketing is still alive and well, so emails are great for that. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. Those are the pros of emails, and are there some cons? 

Carlene Reyes: 

There are some cons to emails. So, one is that it’s spam-ridden. Thank the email gods for spam filters because spam loves making its way into our inboxes. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yes. Thank you, Spam gods. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yes. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Or Filter gods, I should say. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Right! Filter gods. I did Re a staff the other day that in March of this year, spam messages accounted for 56% of global email traffic. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

That’s off the charts! 

Carlene Reyes: 

That’s a lot, and I guess it’s gotten better because it’s gotten better over time, but that’s still a lot. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Doesn’t seem like it. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah, I know. That’s still a lot. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Next con is that messages can easily get lost in your inbox. We all get so much email. Do you get a lot of email? 

Keith Hitchcock: 

I get so much! It happens to me. Something gets lost. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. Very easy. My personal inbox right now has over 1,200 unread messages. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Really? Probably around the same. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. I have so many emails coming in every day that sometimes I just miss important messages. For example, I got an email from my doctor the other day, and I didn’t see it until a couple of days later as I was scrolling because it was sandwiched in between a couple of marketing emails from different stores, and right now it’s the holidays so you’re getting a lot of coupons and stuff. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Thank goodness you’re okay. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah, I’m all right! I’m all right! Yeah. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

It wasn’t an urgent message. Maybe it was… 

Carlene Reyes: 

I mean, it wasn’t an urgent message. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. 

Carlene Reyes: 

But it was still information that I needed, so I just didn’t see it. Yeah, and because of that, because we get so much email, we’re conditioned now to not see email as a priority medium. It’s not urgent for us. Think about it in the case of your customers. If you need your customers or clients to see a message right away, that might not happen with an email. Most people don’t even have push notifications on their mobile. Keep that in mind if you need to send a customer an urgent message. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

That was email, and before email was ever on the scene, there was the telephone. Actually, it’s still on the scene, and telephone can be a very useful tool. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yes. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Tell us about the pros of the phone. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Obviously, real time conversations, closest you’re going to get to an in person. Sometimes you just need those conversations over the phone to go over more complex information, and sometimes you just don’t feel like writing things out in an email or texting something. If it’s going to take a long time, you’d rather just, “Ugh!” Phone call is the way to go. Phone call could take care of that. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Next is personality and tone. It’s easier to pick up on those kinds of things through the phone. You can tell how the other person is reacting to you conversation, to what you’re saying, their pauses, their laughs. So, it’s good for that. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Next is it’s a high priority medium when you know who’s calling. Yeah. That’s what Caller ID, if you know who’s calling, you have more of an incentive to pick up the phone. Your doctor, your mom, or a friend or whatever, and you’re like, “Oh, yeah. I want to chat with you.” 

Carlene Reyes: 

Next, it does save some time for some things. Great for really quick convos. So, when you and the other person on the other line know that it’s going to be a quick straight to the point call, like getting directions or confirming business hours, you can get that done really fast. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yeah. Okay. Those are the pros. The phone does have a lot of pros. What about the cons? 

Carlene Reyes: 

And the cons on the other side of that last pro, it takes… The phone can take longer for some things. We’ve all been in a situation where you’re trying to get off the phone, but that person just keeps you on. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Sometimes my mother. It’s like that sometimes. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yes. Moms are very guilty of that. It’s only because they love us so much! They just want to stay on the phone with us! 

Keith Hitchcock: 

And I love you too, Mom. 

Carlene Reyes: 

I love you too, Mom. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Okay, so next is the lack of responsiveness. People don’t answer their phone. We wrote and entire eBook about this topic why your customers don’t answer the phone anymore, and it’s due to a bunch of reasons, but mainly scam robo calls, and just… 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Can you blame me? That call from China that I can’t even understand? 

Carlene Reyes: 

No. I don’t want to talk to you. No. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

No. Not going to pick it up. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Our survey, we ran a survey for that eBook, and we found that 87% of consumers ignore phone calls often from unknown numbers. I don’t blame them if I see an incoming call. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yep. Exactly. 

Carlene Reyes: 

If I don’t know who it is, I’m not going to answer. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yeah, me too. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Makes total sense. Next is that it might not be a preferred way to get in touch with someone. Some people just don’t like talking on the phone. Phone anxiety is a real thing, and they’d rather connect with you another way. Last, in terms of accessibility, for things like language barriers, you know can be tough for businesses and customers to connect over a phone. I think, maybe, in a written form, sometimes, they might be a little more comfortable that way, like in email or in a text message. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. Pros and cons of email, of phone, and the last part of the mighty trio is texting. There are, well, as we saw, a lot of businesses are already using texting. A lot are not. So just in case you’re a total newbie to the concept of texting for business, tell us what that is. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yes. So, texting for business is a little different than how you would text with friends and family. Think about it in terms of the volume of people you’ll be dealing with on a day-to-day basis, and just the variety of use cases that texting can be applied to. For a business to run smoothly using text messaging, just like you would with other tools, you need certain features that a personal phone just doesn’t offer, like automation features, like scheduling messages. That’s a huge one. Auto replies is another big one, and the option to text from your computer. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yeah. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. So, makes it really easy because you’re not attached to your phone all day. You want to be able to help customers on a nice big screen there. And of course, there are other things to consider, like TCPA compliance that you should follow. Any business texting their customers, they have these practices that they should be following, and so yeah. There’s plenty more things to talk about in terms of texting for business. We have plenty of content in the resource center if you want to learn more about that. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

One other thing is just dividing your personal and business life. I’m doing my personal texting over here. I want to do my business texting on another app. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. Yeah, and there’s definitely a lot of safety concerns and stuff with that when you’re texting on your personal phone. Lots of things to consider with that, but like I mentioned, we have a ton of those resources. Our blog has a lot of info on that. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. Well, you have some pros and cons of texting, as well. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Pros and cons of texting. People see there’s a part one for pros because we love texting! What can we say? What can we say? Okay. First off, it’s a priority medium. When you see a text notification or you hear that little ping go off, many of us just instinctually grab our phones. Do you do that? 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yes, I do. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. You hear that. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Take a look. 

Carlene Reyes: 

It’s kind of exciting, right? 

Keith Hitchcock: 

It is! 

Carlene Reyes: 

Like, who’s texting me? 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yeah. 

Carlene Reyes: 

But we may not answer right away. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Right. 

Carlene Reyes: 

We may not answer right away. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

But we’re going to take a look. 

Carlene Reyes: 

But we’re going to take a look. Next is it’s a good way to relay quick info. Texting was created for short bite-sized information. A typical SMS caps the character at 160. Next is that it’s close to real time, next best thing to a real time conversation in person or on the phone. It’s especially exciting when you see those three little dot bubbles. Someone’s texting you. And next is, emojis and gifs, adds a little flare, adds a little fun. Yeah. They make messages a little more exciting. We have plenty of surveys that the customers have said, “We don’t mind if business use emojis with us.” 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Right. 

Carlene Reyes: 

It’s just, of course, based on context. Use your common sense with emojis. Make sure you’re using them in the appropriate context, and customers love that. They like feeling that friendliness that they can be themselves in a text conversation with someone. It helps build that close relationship. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yeah. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Great. Okay. You have even more pros, here. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Ah, yes. My part two. It also gives you time to formulate answers. Sometimes you might need time to think over what you want to say, and texting lets you do that. Next, it’s convenient. I can’t always answer my phone. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Right. Me, too. Like, I’m at work, for example, and open space, and I don’t want to disturb people. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah! So, if you have a… Sometimes, especially, what’s needed from us is just a quick yes or no. You can send a quick text for that. No phone call needed for things like that. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Right. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Next, it’s more accessible. Everyone have a native text messaging app on their phone. If you have a customers mobile phone number, you know that there’ an additional way to reach them, and it goes the other way around, too. Next, in terms of accessibility, it does help alleviate that language barrier. Like I mentioned earlier, a customer might feel more comfortable communicating over text. Finally, for a pro, is that it’s less spammy. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yes! 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. No spam, or at least limited spam. There’s more protection for texting. Texting is classified as an information service by the FCC. So, if it were classified as a telecommunication service, like phone calls are, providers wouldn’t be able to scan for and block unwanted texts. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Oh, interesting. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah, which is the spam. Yeah. Our inboxes, or text inboxes might look a little more chaotic today if that wasn’t classified like that. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Well, thank you, FCC. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. Yeah. Thanks a lot. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

That’s great. Okay. You don’t have cons for texting, do you? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Okay. Well, to be fair, we have to give a little bit of cons. As I’ve mentioned throughout all these pros and cons, here, it’s not good for long form. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Right. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. If you have a lot that you need to get out, texting might not be the greatest option for that. Like I said, and SMS is capped at 160. However, Zipwhip does have a character count up to 600 for those times when you just need to say a little more in a text. We totally understand that, and our customers did let us know that that’s a feature that they wanted. We did release that recently, but not good for long form. If you’re going to be texting our a really long message bubble and you’re seeing that it’s going on, schedule… 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Maybe you should email, right? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Schedule a phone call or email, but send a text to schedule that phone call or email. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yeah. 

Carlene Reyes: 

All right. Next, it’s less precise in tone. There have been plenty of times where I’ve maybe said something in a text and it was taken another way. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yep. 

Carlene Reyes: 

I don’t know. Has that happened to you? 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Oh, same thing. When I get texts from friends once in a while, it’s like, just says, “K”. I’m like… 

Carlene Reyes: 

The “K.”? 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Are you mad at me? Or… Why so short? 

Carlene Reyes: 

And that person might not even be thinking about that. They just want to acknowledge that they saw your text, but it’s just stuff like that. Emojis help alleviate things. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yeah. That’s true. 

Carlene Reyes: 

“K (Thumbs up)” 

Carlene Reyes: 

And finally, they’re not good for large attachments. If you need to send an attachment, do it through email. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. Not the phone? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Not the phone. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. All right. These… 

Carlene Reyes: 

But if you can find out how to do it with phone, that’d be pretty cool. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

That was part one. Good to go through all of those pros and cons of each of the mighty trio of texting, phone and email. We’re going to shift gears into part two. Yes. With these Use Cases. So, what are we doing here? 

Carlene Reyes: 

All right. Now that we’ve laid out the pros and cons for each when reaching our customers, we’re going to go over the current Zipwhip customers use each of these three mediums to reach their audience effectively. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. So, some real world usages of these different… Using these elements for the strengths of what they have. Yes? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yes. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. Let’s start with Title Boxing Club. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Title Boxing Club! Yes. I was a member of Title Boxing here in Seattle for a few years. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Really? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Are you a boxer? 

Carlene Reyes: 

I guess you could say that. I’m not a boxer. I’d like to be. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

You look like a boxer. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Well. Yeah, so they’re a great group of people over there at Title Boxing. They focus on heavy bag boxing workouts, and because I’m a marketer, I pay attention to how they communicated with their members. I like how they incorporated email, text, and phone seamlessly in their communication strategies. So, let’s go over that. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. Let’s talk about how they email over there. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yes. First was email. They would use their email to send the class schedule for the week. You want to let members know what to expect for the week ahead so they can plan out everything. Emails are great for this type of content because it lets you really get meaty with the info that you want to share. Their newsletters have a lot of reminders about upcoming studio events, monthly challenges, and reminders or call outs to future classes. If you think about sending that all over a text message wouldn’t work because it’s just too long. Yeah. Email lets you structure and format content freely, so it’s easily digestible that way. It’s a great option for their weekly newsletter. Well done. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Nicely done. They’re also phoning over there. 

Carlene Reyes: 

They are phone, and it’s exactly what you’d be expecting from any gym, prospects calling all the time asking about classes, about membership options. It’s a good way to get an understanding of the prospects fitness goals and for Title to explain the rates. Great for them. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. They are emailing and phoning. They’re also texting over there. 

Carlene Reyes: 

And they are texting. As a Zipwhip customer, they branded their landline phone number with the option to text or call. It gives prospects an added option to reach them. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

That’s on the same number that they can do that. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah, exactly. On their landline phone. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yeah. 

Carlene Reyes: 

So, texting has been beneficial to them in a unique way because it’s a noisy studio with classes going on all day. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Right. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah, there’s loud music blaring. There’s a lot of smacking the heavy bags and stuff. It’s not a quiet area. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Right. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Because of that, employees won’t always hear the phone ring. I’d see them take the phone outside during class time. A lot, they had to rush outside to go take a phone call if they needed to. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yeah. 

Carlene Reyes: 

But a fun way they use Zipwhip is that they do see an incoming call, and they can’t leave their desk. It’s noise. They’ll text back the number that just called in, and they’ll just send them a quick text that says something like, “Hey, got your message, but we…” Or, “Hey we saw that you called, but we can’t talk on the phone right now because a class is going on, but feel free to text us if you have any questions.” That’s worked out really well for them. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Hmm. 

Carlene Reyes: 

They recaptured any of those lost connections, there. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Nicely done, Title Boxing. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. Very cool. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Everything that you’re talking about here could apply to other gyms and studios. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Of course. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

I mean, a bunch of other businesses, types of businesses, as well. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. Definitely. There’s a lot to take away from this, and one thing that I did want to mention, just a cool way to use texting because we did recently just run a couple of surveys for fitness consumers and studio owners. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

You had an idea. Okay. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. My idea. So, for the fitness eBook we put together, we asked fitness consumers about how they would want to be contacted over different use cases, over different situations, and one of them, we asked how they would feel about receiving words of encouragement. 66% said that they would prefer to receive them over text instead of phone or email. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Wow. 

Carlene Reyes: 

The phone I understand. You don’t want to get a phone call going, “Come to class.” But in the email, I guess I was a little surprised by that. I guess I was expecting, I guess… I don’t know what I was expecting, but yesterday was a really gloomy day, and I was going to get over to the gym, and then I wasn’t going to make it, and then I thought about this as I was preparing for the webinar. I’m thinking, “You know what? It would be really nice to get a text from my gym saying, ‘It’s gloomy outside, but that doesn’t mean you have to skip your workout.’” And then it would’ve made me feel guilty, and I would’ve gone in! I still went in, but I was just thinking it’s nice to get that encouragement. It gives a real personalized… You know, you get that personal relationship with your gym. That’s really nice. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

That was really helpful to break down each of those elements. That was Use Case One. We’re going to move on to Use Case number Two and how this other business is using the different mighty trio. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Exactly. Next is Neighborhood Credit Union. They are located in Dallas, Texas, and they’ve been in operation since 1930. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Wow! 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. It’s nice to see when an older business is still innovating and finding new ways to connect with customers. So we wanted to… 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Almost 90 years. 

Carlene Reyes: 

…shout out to them, here. Here’s how they use text and phone together as we go on to the next slide. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. Here we go. 

Carlene Reyes: 

There we go. As a Zipwhip customer, the first thing that they do when the staff comes into the office, they check over any texts that they received while they were out, and then they start replying to them one by one. They process requests from their members, answer quick questions, and if someone has requested a phone call, they set that up through text. Easy to do. No phone required. Saves them a lot of time. And one thing Neighborhood really loves about texting is that their members can provide them with important documents right away. For example, you can just snap a picture of their driver’s license, power of attorney, name affidavits. Before they adopted texting, it could be really hard to get documents from members on time because the fact is that people don’t check their email as often. Being able to do this and just quickly snap the picture, it’s helped their loan funding specialists move the process along faster. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yeah. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Very cool, and then they’re also emailing and texting to their… 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yes. Email and texting. So, they use texting to alert members of important emails. So, a lot of their business is done over email, but because, like we just said, people aren’t checking their emails, send a little text to give them a notification. They’ll send one, for example, that says, “Hey, your loan documents are ready to sign. You should find them in your email inbox. Let us know if you have any questions.” That’s a nice alert for them, and that way, they can just go straight to the email, sign the docs and be done with it. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Love it! 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah, and just before we move on, on a separate note, Neighborhood really appreciates that texting has also helped them build a close relationship with their members. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Interesting. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah! So, even after a loan has been finalized, Neighborhood will get texts from their members with a picture of their new car or home or whatever that says, “Thank you for your help!” 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Aw! That’s so sweet! 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah, it’s very sweet. People are appreciative, and it’s nice that they can just send a quick text for that. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

It gives that element of personalization when you’re going back and forth like that. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah, definitely. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Love it. Okay. Those are two Use Cases, and now we’re onto our Use Case number Three, and doing something a little bit different this time. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yay! So the following examples are just going to be a little bit different than what we went over. We’re going to include… Well, we were thinking of including another customer example, but we wanted to walk you through the process of a few scenarios that a business would run through step by step by step. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Right. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yes. To give you a clear picture of how all this works together. In this case, let’s talk about insurance. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Insurance! So, we are going to take an insurance agent, me. This is my insurance company, Reyes Insurance. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

I love your logo! 

Carlene Reyes: 

I know. It’s so pretty! I will be communicating with a homeowner’s insurance client. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Played by me, Keith. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yes. Keith, who is not yet a client. I’m hoping to make him a client. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

No. No, I’m not. You have to sell me on this. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yes. I will do my best. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. 

Carlene Reyes: 

All right. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

To that end, these are the different scenarios we’re going to go through, and we’re starting with the sales. I, actually, was attracted to Carlene’s logo. I found it on the web, and I gave Carlene a phone call to ask for a quote on homeowner’s insurance. Hello? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yes, but I am missing the call. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Oh, man. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Sorry, Keith, because I’m out running an errand. I’m not at my desk, but in my voicemail, my outgoing message, I do say that there is an option to text me if you prefer. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay, well, I actually do skip the voicemail because I would like a text conversation because I’m at work. It’s a little easier for me. So, I’m going to text you with a little, “Hi, Carlene. I’m hoping to get a quote for homeowner’s insurance. Can you help?” 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. So, I do have Zipwhip on my phone, and so I get his text message. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Oh, nice. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. So I text back and suggest that we have a phone call. I’m excited to talk to him. So I ask about Keith’s availability. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. And we work it out. Here’s the text conversation with us working it out, and we’re scheduled for a 1PM call tomorrow. 

Carlene Reyes: 

1PM call tomorrow. Now, I am back at my desk, and I’m going to schedule a text to send Keith for tomorrow before our phone call at 12:45 as a reminder that we have a chit chat appointment. I sent it with a text because in case Keith needs to reschedule, he can just let me know through that conversation. I wouldn’t want to send an email as a reminder because, like we said, that’s not an urgent… 

Keith Hitchcock: 

I might miss it. 

Carlene Reyes: 

You might miss it. So, text is the way to go for that, for reminders. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

I agree because I get this text message from you, and it’s such a busy day at work that I might have blown off this call, frankly, because… But, this gives me enough time to finish off a couple things or reschedule them to actually have this call. It was a good thing you texted. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yeah, and indeed we have this call straight on the dot at 1 o’clock, and we discuss insurance options. I have lots of questions. Ultimately, I request a quote. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yes! All right. After our call, I send Keith a quote via email with an attachment, and I let him know that he can follow up with me any time. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Thank you. 

Carlene Reyes: 

All right. So, now we’re going to do a little time traveling. Let’s fast forward. It’s been two days, and I haven’t heard anything from Keith. Where’s Keith? I’m going to send him a little gentle nudge. I want to make sure that he got my email. It’s during the day, so I know he might not be able to answer the phone because he’s at work. I’m just going to send him a quick text that says, “Hello, Keith! Following up with you. I wanted to make sure you received the home insurance quote. Let me know if I can answer any questions.” 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Well, the week did kind of get away from me. I got a busy job at Zipwhip, and I’m actually glad to get this reminder because I remember I did have a question for her about homeowner’s insurance. So, I text her back, “Thanks, Carlene. Could you remove flood coverage from the home and send over an updated quote?” 

Carlene Reyes: 

And I say, “Sure thing! I’ll email that shortly.” 

Carlene Reyes: 

Fifteen minutes later, I fix up the quote and I tell Keith, “Hey, I’ve updated the quote, and I sent it to your inbox.” 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Beautiful. Long story short, what happens? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Long story short, I used the mighty trio of text, email and phone call to help me secure a new client. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

You got a client! 

Carlene Reyes: 

I got a client! Yay! 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Nice work! 

Carlene Reyes: 

Keith is my client now. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

That was the Sales Cycle. Let’s move on to Claims, and AH! A tree fell on my garage. Totally crushed it, and not in a good way. I’m giving Carlene a call to talk about that. 

Carlene Reyes: 

I’m bummed out for Keith, but I’m here to help. I ask him if he can text me a photo of the damage because this will help me document and process the claim faster for Keith. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

I do snap a few photos and send them Carlene. It’s so nice to be able to send then via text. That’s very handy. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. Very instant. I’m seeing this photo, and I go, “Yikes!” That’s a lot of damage. I text Keith back, and I say, “Glad no one was hurt. Are you available now for a call with an adjuster because we want to get this done quickly.” 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yes! Let’s get it done quickly! Let’s do it! 

Carlene Reyes: 

All right. So, I call Keith and then conference in the adjuster. I introduce them to one another, let them do their thing and then get off the phone. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

It’s great. I’m so glad that I’m actually text enabled with the adjuster, too, because he’s keeping me up to date with the process. There’s actually some element, lots of documentation that they need along the way, including this quote from ABC Construction. There’s a couple other quotes. 

Carlene Reyes: 

You just snap a picture of it and send it to them. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

It’s so handy! 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. It’s really nice. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

I love it. Long story short, what happened in this? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Long story short, Reyes Insurance has used the mighty trio of text, email and phone to help our client Keith through the claims process. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

So nice. 

Carlene Reyes: 

I know. So helpful. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

So happy. 

Carlene Reyes: 

All right. Next, on-going client relationships. So, we’re going to pull back on the role playing just a little bit and give you some ideas on how… 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Aw… 

Carlene Reyes: 

I know. That was fun. Well, there’s a little bit. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. 

Carlene Reyes: 

So, how texting and email in particular can be used to nurture client relationships. We’re still going to be using the example of the insurance agent because I just have such a beautiful logo. I just want to keep it for the rest of this webinar here. All right. So, let’s see how email and text can be used together. This is a fun one. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Let’s say, insurance agent, every quarter, I send Keith and my other clients a newsletter which contains tips and tricks for home maintenance and along with upsell opportunities. Yeah. As you can see here in our little example, at the end the email invites… I email my clients to text the word “Auto” to get an insurance quote. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

This is just a snippet of your newsletter. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. Snippet of what you could do. It’s a really easy way to just continue that engagement, at least get the idea in their head that they can just pull out the phone and text you. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yeah. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Great way to do that. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

In fact, I might just text because I’m very happy with this homeowner policy. I might switch over my auto. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah! 

Keith Hitchcock: 

We’ll see. 

Carlene Reyes: 

We have a good client relationship here. I’m glad that you’re considering that. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yeah. 

Carlene Reyes: 

All right. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

There is also… What else might you do here in December. 

Carlene Reyes: 

All right. So, here is an idea of how you could send a text during this time of year. It’s December. Holidays. Want to make sure you’re keeping your customers and clients in mind. Want to wish them Happy Holidays. Make sure that you’re thinking about them. I am going to send out a text to Keith in a group text, but it’s going to be personalized because I’m using Zipwhip’s template feature. As you can see here in the little brackets it says “First name”. That’s not what everyone’s going to see. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

This is what I see. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. This is what you’re going to see. I send a text, and Keith will see this as, “Hi. Just a quick note to wish you the very best of the holiday season. Have a happy new years! (Snowflake emoji)” 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Very nice. Well, I really appreciate this. Even though it might be a group text and other people might be getting this, I still feel good about the relationship, and so it’s easy enough for me just to text back and say, “Thank you! Happy Holidays!” 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah! So, because you want to go a step further with personalization, names are a great way to do that with those name fields, but of course, you want to maybe keep that conversation going just a little bit. You can personalize it by maybe mentioning something that you helped them out with this year, and in this case, I remember very well your little garage snafu with the tree. I do want to say, “Hope you’re loving your new garage!” 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Thumbs up. I did. Really, it was a good cap to what was a terrible story. 

Carlene Reyes: 

All right. Okay. Long story short, throughout this entire process, we’ve used the mighty trio of email, phone call and text throughout the entire life cycle of our working relationship with Keith. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Well done, Carlene of Reyes Insurance. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. Yeah. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Very proud of you. 

Carlene Reyes: 

I should get into the insurance business. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

You might! You got a future there. 

Carlene Reyes: 

I’ll take my logo with me. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. It is time for us to… That was the main presentation. We want to see if you are still with us out there, and maybe you’re getting inspired around texting along with emailing and phoning in the right ways, but we are curious at this point. What is the most important texting use case for your company, in your opinion? Whether or not you are already texting or not, we’re kind of curious. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Where do you stand with this? We’ll give you a couple moments to engage with that. It’s always fun to see how different businesses and what the different use cases they gravitate towards, and maybe they’ve gotten some ideas here. Let’s close the poll and see what people are saying. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Oh, great. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

What do you think? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. Customer service and support is over 30%. That’s a large group. Yeah. Just what we expect. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yeah. That’s what I would expect. It’s mostly that relationship building and helping out with questions, this quick information. 

Carlene Reyes: 

And scheduling alerts. Great job, everyone! Yeah. That’s really great. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

All right. Thanks for playing. I think we are finally to our Q&A section. Are we not? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yes! 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay, and we have some questions coming in. If questions are popping into your brain right now, go ahead and drop those in the little question window, and we will get to as many of these as we can before we have to sign off. Let’s start with the first one that I see here, which is, “I use Sales Force. Can I use Zipwhip with that?” 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. Yes. You can use Sales Force with Zipwhip. We’re compatible with a lot of other popular CRMs. The great thing about that is you can still use the tools that you’d use every day, but you can just merge Zipwhip texting features into your CRMs. Yeah, that’s really great. I highly recommend checking out our integrations marketplace on our website to learn more about that. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

A lot of great ways you can integrate things. Okay. Next question. How long is the optimal length of a text? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah, that’s a good question. As we always say, the shorter the better. Texting was created for brevity. It was created to get… You don’t want something too long. When a customer sees a text, they’re going to expect a short message service. That’s what they’re going to expect to see. You don’t want to annoy your customers or clients with a really long wall of text. If you’re finding yourself doing that where you’re just going on and on and on, consider an email or consider scheduling a phone call with them. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

We’ve talked about pros and cons of those. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. Oh, sorry. I didn’t mean to interrupt you. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

It’s just to reiterate that. There are those other mediums that may be better for longer information, if you need to go that route. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah, and as we’ve mentioned, we did recently increase our character count by popular demand. For the times when you are like, “Well, I really do just want to lay this out in a simple text here just to make it easier on them.” You can do that. We don’t recommend doing it all the time. Like I said, shorter is better, but if you need to, it’s there. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. Next question. If I sent a bulk text with Zipwhip, I don’t want everyone to see an individual’s response. How does that work? 

Keith Hitchcock: 

How does the group texting work with Zipwhip? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Personal texting with a group is a little different than Zipwhip texting. You know when you’re on your personal phone and you have a group of, maybe, your family or something and everyone’s just chiming in all the time, and you’re just like, “Oh my gosh. Please stop.” That’s how you would with personal texting. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Group texting is a little different. You can send out texts to a group of people and it will be a blind carbon copy. What that does, is that even though you’re sending a message to a group of people, that person, the recipient, is still going to see a one-on-one conversation with you. Not everyone is going to see the answers and yadda, yadda. It’s a lot easier that way. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Just like that holiday text that you sent out, that Carlene sent out, the insurance agent. I responded, and no one else saw that response except for Carlene. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yes. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yeah. Great. Okay. I think we have time for about one more question here. That is, “Does Zipwhip utilize AI?” Artificial Intelligence. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Artificial Intelligence. Actually… 

Keith Hitchcock: 

I think the answer would be not so much. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

There’s other texting services that might just spit out an automatic response, and we do have our keyword and auto responses that, essentially, play that role, some sense of that role. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. I think what we would like to… Well, the reason why we love texting so much is that it’s a good opportunity to have those automation features with keywords and stuff to help take care of marketing campaigns or something, or to take care of any queues. Easy stuff like that that wouldn’t really require a person on the other side to come in. It’s just easy stuff that’s a real time saver for businesses, but in the situation where a customer would keep on texting and maybe they text in a keyword, they get an auto response, they have more questions, and that’s not something that’s built for. We really like promoting that you need that human element to come in. We’ve run surveys where people would rather talk to a real person than a chat pot for when they need help with something. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yeah. That can get so frustrating. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. The great thing about two-way communication is that when you need automation there to help you out with the easy stuff, that’s there, but then when there’s something a little more sophisticated that needs help with, you can get an employee. Someone can easily just pop into that conversation. It’s a way to merge the two there. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

And one of the things we do best is that two way, or conversational texting. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. Yeah. Customers tend to be a little frustrated when you… Well, not a little. A lot frustrated when they’re trying to reply to texts, for example, with keywords, and they can’t. They don’t have that option to talk to a real human. It’s happened to me a lot. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yeah. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. So, I’ve been annoyed where I’m just like, “I don’t want to call. I just want to text in this conversation.” Yeah. It’s a great way to make that easier on your customers. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Thanks for all your great questions, and there might be a few others we haven’t gotten to. We’ll do our best to actually follow up with you personally to get your question answered. As we start to close up here, I want to remind you of that text line that we have. Feel free to text this word, if you haven’t already, “Mighty” to get some additional blog posts, eBooks, that sort of thing that can feed your curiosity into the next step about email versus texting, ultimate guide for texting your customers, that kind of stuff. [crosstalk 00:43:04] You can also, if you really want to continue the conversation with a human, we do that too. Text “Chat” to this line, and we’ll make sure that someone gets connected with you, and you can continue that conversation. We’re also available for questions via that line. If you want to text your question that we didn’t get to, feel free to text it to that line, as well. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Thank you. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Thank you! 

Keith Hitchcock: 

For this. This was fantastic. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. I hope everyone had fun and learned a thing or two. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

I had fun. Let’s continue the role plays. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Okay! 

Keith Hitchcock: 

And thank you for joining us. We couldn’t do this without you, too. You’re part of the mix. We have a webinar in January that is all about recruitment and staffing. It’s optimizing texting for recruitment and staffing. If your business has anything to do with that. A lot of businesses have a recruitment element to it. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah, oh, definitely. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

This might be handy for that. Again, if you do want to continue feeding your curiosity, I do… If there’s one thing you’re going to check out, I recommend the ultimate guide to texting your customers. This is a free eBook. When I follow up with that follow up email, or if you text our line, you’ll get a link to that, and it’s such a great resource. You helped with that. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Thank you. Yeah, yeah. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Thanks again for joining us. As I close the webinar, there’s going to be a survey that pops up on your screen. Thanks for taking a moment to fill that out. Well, hope to see you on another webinar, and good luck with the mighty trio of texting, emailing, and phoning your customers. See you next time! 

Carlene Reyes: 

Bye, everyone! 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Buh-bye. 

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