Featuring

Best Practices for Texting Your Customers

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Did you know 83% of consumers will respond to a text message within 30 minutes or less? If your business relies on efficient communication with customers, it’s time to consider adding texting to your tech stack.

Of course, adopting new technology requires several important steps for success. That’s why we recently released The Ultimate Guide to Texting Your Customers — a free e-book designed to ease the process and help businesses start texting successfully.

Join us on July 31 for a 30-minute, interactive webinar where we’ll share a few takeaways from our new guide and answer all your questions. Our host, Keith Hitchcock, will be joined by Carlene Reyes, a resident writer at Zipwhip who spends every day researching and writing about the latest trends in communication and texting for business.

You’ll learn about

  • Different types of texting tools (and how to choose between them)
  • Considerations for prepping and training your team
  • Texting etiquette
  • And more!

Featuring

Staff Writer Carlene Reyes
Carlene Reyes
Writer & Textpert
Bill Higbee Headshot
Keith Hitchcock
Digital Content Producer

Keith Hitchcock: 

Hello and welcome to another webinar at Zipwhip in Seattle, Washington. This is best practices for texting your customers. I’m your host, Keith Hitchcock, Digital Content Producer here at Zipwhip. This webinar series is designed to help business professionals like yourself with their customer communication strategies. And we offer you practical tips and tools, resources, high level thought to help you with your business goals. So this week we’re talking about best practices for texting your customers. And this is content inspired by The Ultimate Guide to Texting your Customers, which is an ebook that we recently produced. It’s a free download. You can find it on our site. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

If you’re not seeing this link to the ultimate guide that I dropped in the chat window, I’ll go ahead and drop that again. Let me do it to the right audience here. There it is. So feel free to follow that link and download this free ebook if you want a follow along supplement what we’re doing. A lot of the content that you’re getting today is inspired from that. So whether you are contemplating texting for business or you’ve already started with it and you’re not quite sure if you’re doing everything right, you’ve come to the right place. So without further ado, let me introduce our presenter today. This is Carlene Reyes. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Hello. My grand entrance, 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yeah, great entrance. We worked on that. We rehearsed that several times. And I thought you did wonderfully. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Thank you. A plus for me. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Carlene, tell us a little bit more about yourself and what you do here. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah, so I’m a writer here at Zipwhip. I focus mainly on our blogs, on our blog and ebooks. I spend all day every day researching and writing about the texting for business space and how Zipwhip helps businesses reach their customer communication goals. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Awesome. Well, you’re the right person for the job, so I’m so glad you’re here. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Excited to be here. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

You have gotten to know each of us in a little bit of a way, so let’s get to know you out there in a little bit of a way. We’re going to launch a poll here and we would love to hear from you, is your business currently texting customers? So it should be a simple question for folks, so go ahead and engage with that. Possibilities here are yep, not yet, not sure. Sometimes I worry about the folks who are not sure, but it’s possible you’re in a big enough company that there’s texting going on to customers that you’re not quite sure about. All right. A couple more moments before I close that poll. Let’s do that. And let’s look at the results. In fact, there is Oh, here, let me share the results with you. There is someone who’s not sure which is either a joke or maybe they actually don’t know, which is interesting. What do you take of this? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah, so that’s a good amount of people who are texting their customers. That’s great. This webinar, by the end of it, you should have a good idea of whether you’re on the right track, if you are following best practices. And for those of you who aren’t yet texting, this will give you a good kind of preview as to what you should expect before you launch into texting your customers. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

That was our first poll. And we actually have a second poll question. So we want to get to know you even better here. Have you downloaded The Ultimate Guide to Texting Your Customers? I already dropped that link in there. You don’t have to. It’s totally optional. Just wondering if you’ve already done that yet because it might alter how we are presenting here today. So it’s either yep, not yet, or I did, but my dog ate it. So couple more moments to engage with that and let’s take a look at the results, Carlene. Some people have not. So does that give you a sense? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah, yeah, great. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

And some people actually did have their dog eat that. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah, those naughty dogs out there eating our ebooks. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Oh, dogs, will you please behave out there? Okay. So Carlene, we have a little bit of housekeeping then we can dive into the content. First of all, if you’re new to the GoToWebinar platform, it’s pretty simple that you should have a control panel off to the side of the main presentation that’s going on where you can adjust your audio, your audio listening devices. There is the all important question window, which we think of as the question and comment window. So whenever you have something to say or a question that you’re wondering, go ahead and pop that in there. We actually have a dedicated time for that, even though it’s a little bit of time at the end. So we’ll get to as many questions as we can there. And as a brief thank you for engaging with our survey, after we close the webinar, we’re going to send you a link to the video recording of what we’re doing right now and the slides to what we’re presenting right now, and I’m sure lots of other helpful links, like link to the ultimate guide. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. I think we’re good to go. Let’s dive into this. Our main content here is we’re getting two chapters today. There is the, before you text chapter and there is the texting etiquette chapter. But I felt like we needed a little bit of background before we dive in. So first of all, just in case, what is texting for business? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. Good to have a little background first. So let’s compare it to personal texting. So with personal texting, super casual, you’re usually only communicating with a few people at a time, your friends and your family. And if you want, you can have a full on conversation in emojis or gifs. But texting for business is a little different. So because of the volume of people that you’ll be interacting with on a daily basis and the variety of use cases that can be applied to texting, you’re going to need features that just aren’t available with a personal phone. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. What kind of features are you talking about here? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. So a big one is automation features. So features that are going to carry out tasks for you that you do day in and day out. They’ll do it for you so you don’t really have to think about it. It saves a lot of time in the long run. So things like scheduled messaging and auto replies. Excuse me. And of course, to save your thumbs from falling off because you’re going to be texting a bunch of people, there’s the handy ability to text from your computer. So, yeah. But this is where texting tools like Zipwhip come in. Choosing a texting for a specific software for your business is worth it because they come equipped with features that you need to text efficiently and to keep your communications organized. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

And so what are the major differences between personal texting and texting for businesses that we should know about? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. One last thing that I did want to just talk about with the major difference there is that as a business, anytime you’re interacting, you’re texting a customer, if you’re doing it from your personal phone or whether you’re doing it from specialized software, there are TCPA compliance best practices to follow. And of course the TCPA is the Telephone Consumer Protection Act. So we won’t get into TCPA today, but we do cover why it’s important along with some do’s and don’ts in our Ultimate Guide to Texting Your Customers. So make sure to take a peek at that. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

I want to reiterate that we have that handy TCPA ebook that talks about that as well. So I’ll be sure to toss that link in there later on. So we’re talking about texting for businesses. What kind of businesses that are doing this in the world? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah, so basically every type of industry is texting their customers, think real estate, entertainment, construction, automotive, education. It just shows that texting isn’t a niche tool. It really can be applied to a variety of businesses. So I did bring a few stats from our state of texting report just to show our audience out there how much texting’s popularity has grown with businesses. And for those of you who don’t know what our state of texting report is, it’s a very comprehensive report that we released earlier this year where we surveyed 2000 businesses and consumers to just get a pulse of the state of texting, what that looks like in today’s world. So from that, we got 39% of companies surveyed are using texting for business. So whether that’s on your personal phone or through specialized software, 39% of companies are using texting for business. And another stat that’s worth noting is that 79% of consumers that were surveyed said that they received some kind of text from a business. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Most of us. 

Carlene Reyes: 

79%, that’s a huge amount. So that should tell you that if you’re not texting, your competitors likely are. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Probably so. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Probably. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. That is setting the context today. Thank you for that. And now let’s dive into the meat of this. Before you start texting, this is chapter one, Before You Text. What are the kinds of tools that businesses are using for texting their customers and what should businesses be thinking about? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. So there are a couple that I want to talk about today. The first one is a personal cell phone. Now I do bring this up and I want to call it out because our sales team comes across businesses who tell us that they’re interacting with customers on their personal cell phones and they’re okay doing that. We understand the appeal of doing it, we understand the convenience, but we don’t recommend it. Now, we don’t have time to get into it into this webinar for the reasons why, but I do want to call out just a couple. One would be protecting company assets and another one would be protecting your customer information. So if you do want to learn more, we have a post on the blog that goes over this topic. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay, wonderful. So I think one of the first tools you’re talking about is short code texting. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Mm-hmm (affirmative). 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah, there we go. So short code texting. These are really popular. Some businesses choose to send their customers texts through a short code number, which is a five or six digit number. It’s leased by the CTIA. And that’s the US Wireless Industry Organization. Businesses that send a high volume of texts tend to go for short codes. Interacting with short codes will sometimes require the use of a key word. So just throw an example out there, say you’re a pizza shop and you have an ad out somewhere like text pizza to 55687 and you get a free slice on your next visit. I’ve never seen that out in the wild, but I would totally text that number if that was the case. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yes, you would. You like the pizza. 

Carlene Reyes: 

I would. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yeah. 

Carlene Reyes: 

And of course, just another example for you nonprofits. They’ll use them to send links to their audience for donations to get them to go to donation pages. So if you’re a business that just needs a megaphone, a platform to only send notifications or to get people to engage with a link, a short code might be for you. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. So something like a megaphone, a business speaking to broad audience, not necessarily wanting to have a conversation, but getting a message out to a lot of people. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. So that’s short code. Any downsides to using short code? 

Carlene Reyes: 

There are a couple of downsides. So for the most part, there isn’t an ability for replies. So the recipient can’t reply to that message, of course, except for the case with a keyword, but you’re only limited to that keyword. So it’s not really a conversation. And the second thing I wanted to point out is that they can be expensive. So anywhere from $500 a month to $1000. So just keep that in mind if you’re exploring short codes. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. Little expensive potentially. Okay. So that was short code texting. So how about 10-digit texting and toll-free? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah, so this is our favorite. We love 10-digit and toll-free here at Zipwhip. I mean, that’s what we do. We text enable these numbers. And the reason why we do that is texting through a 10 digit phone number or toll free offers more flexibility than a short code in terms of customer service and building a relationship with your audience. So it offers conversational texting. So it’s also known as two way texting, you might see that out there. So your customers can have a back and forth chit chat with your business. Texting is an intimate medium, and this really takes advantage of that because it’s a great way to engage and personalize your interactions with your audience so that they can become repeat customers. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

So the tools we’re talking about here, businesses are going to have different use cases. And so what would you say is the use case for customer service? What’s that experience with 10-digit and toll-free? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. So I’ll go back to my pizza example just because I’ve got pizza on the mind. So say that you have a customer that texts that code in for their free slice, they get an automated response from that short code saying like, “Hey, here’s your coupon.” Maybe that customer is wondering if they have gluten free options, they’re gluten intolerant so they text in, “Hey, are there any gluten free options for me?” The best they’re likely going to get with a short code might be just an automated response from the robot and just saying we don’t recognize that your request or for more help go here. So what’s going to happen to that customer, they’re going to have to spend time going to either your website, going to Yelp, searching for the answer, or maybe calling your business, or they’re just going to forget about the offer and then forget about your business. 

Carlene Reyes: 

So with two way texting, it just kind of changes it. It makes the user experience a lot more, just a lot more exciting because you can still get your coupon. And when you text that, “Do you have gluten free options?” A human can actually pop into that conversation and say, “Why yes we do.” Or they can say, “No, we don’t, but we have another thing for you here.” 

Keith Hitchcock: 

So there’s more options and if it feels like a potentially better customer service. If that’s your use case, you might want to think about 10-digit. Yeah. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. As a pizza lover, I want answers now. So I would appreciate that. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Can I have mushrooms on that as well? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

There’s also a brand awareness element to 10-digit and toll-free. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah, definitely. So you think about your phone number, it’s a part of your brand, it’s what people recognize. So giving your customers the option to text on the same number that they call is just a better customer experience for them. It’s less confusing and that’s not something you can do with short codes. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yeah. Got it. Okay. Any other considerations? Oh, actually, I wanted to cover now short code is good for, you mentioned, is good for high volume. Isn’t toll free also good for high volume? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. Yeah. Toll-free is definitely a good option if you’re a business that needs to send out a bunch of messages at once. Toll-free could be a good option for you with the added benefit of enabling a conversational text messaging. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. So what other considerations are there before a business dives into actually texting their customers? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. So let’s talk about your team’s training and adoption. So these are the people who are going to be using the texting tool, they’re going to be interacting with your customers. So you want to make sure that everyone is on board and they understand what’s expected of them. So really have them understand the value in adopting a product like texting for business. Like I mentioned, they should understand why they’re expected to use it, how it will help company goals, and how the customer journey is going to change. But more importantly, it’s a good opportunity to help them understand what’s in it for them. So people will be more likely to use a product often once they understand the benefits that it’s going to bring to their day to day job. So really personalize it for them. Maybe they’ll have more time throughout the day for other tasks because they won’t be answering as many phone calls or maybe they’ll have a more zen-like experience throughout their day because they’re not going to be frustrated that customers aren’t getting back to them. So things like that. Personalize it for them. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. It’s interesting, you’re talking about sort of the mental and emotional preparation for the team, it sounds like. But what about actually getting into the nuts and bolts of learning this tool? What’s important to think about? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah, for sure. So some people are excited to learn new tools while others might not be so tech savvy or so excited to bring those on board. So it’s a good idea to find tools that are easy to use, have an intuitive interface so your teams have as few obstacles as possible to overcome in the adoption process. You want to make things easy on them. So make sure to offer training if it’s needed. Training will look different for every business, but a few things that you can keep in mind is setting up even just a couple of hours to go over features, use cases, expectations, and just giving employees a chance to play around with the product and interact with it. It’s a great start. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yeah. Yeah. How about incentivizing your team? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yes, I love incentives. Yeah. I mean, make it fun for your team too. It’s a small thing, but it can make a difference. Set goals. Maybe at the end of the week, how many messages can we send out? Who’s using our feature the most? Things like that. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

If Carlene sends X amount of texts, she’s going to get pizza or donuts. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yes. I would 100% be on board with that. Yes. Yeah. That would make me use my texting for business tool. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. Any last points we should talk about in terms of training your teams in this stage of things? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. Another major one that you want to consider is that you should be going over legal and compliance best practices with your team. Not as intimidating as it sounds. We have a TCPA ebook on our website. That’s a great resource for legal and compliance best practices. It’s in a plain English, easy to understand. So you’re not going to see a lot of jargony stuff that’s going to put you to sleep. So you should download that and read through it with your team. And of course, texting for business comes with its own set of etiquette to follow. So I’ll talk about that in the next chapter. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

It’s a wonderful segue to chapter two, the Texting Etiquette. So we probably all have our own set of etiquette as we’re texting friends and family and acquaintances and whatnot, but there’s probably, it’s a different game when we start texting as a business to customers and that relationship. So what kind of texting etiquette should we be thinking about, Carlene? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. So the first one I want to chit chat about is be mindful of the time of day. Yes. Be mindful of the time of the day. As a general guideline, keep your texting within business hours. To all the businesses out there, I’m just going to say, when I am sitting on my couch and watching Stranger Things, I’m about to binge watch, and then I phone goes off and I see a text from a business, I’ll be a little mad. So don’t interrupt my binge watching time. But there are going to be instances where maybe you’re working late or something and you’re like, “Oh, I need to send out these texts. But I don’t want to interrupt my customers right now.” This is where text scheduling, tools like text scheduling come in, automation tools. You can write a text whenever, schedule it to go out the next day at a more reasonable hour. And that’s one of my favorite features that we have here at Zipwhip. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yeah, that makes a lot of sense. We’ve programmed ourselves to basically be available at all times of day and be sending and receiving texts at all times of the day. But business world is a little bit different. So that’s a great tip of etiquette there. So next one you’ve brought for us to consider is introduce yourself. Tell us about this. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. Introduce yourself. So you want to clearly state who you are and what you need from your customer. And that might sound obvious, but you never know if your customer doesn’t have you saved in their phone. But we like doing this with auto signatures at the bottom of texts. And it can be something super simple like Keith from Zipwhip, text or call this number. It doesn’t have to be a big thing. But we like those because when a customer opens that message, it’s going to be an instant signal to them that it’s coming from an actual person and not from a robot, it’s not spam. So they’ll more likely to engage with that. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yeah. I actually love that little feature in the Zipwhip tool that the signature that I can be turning off or on depending on where I am in the conversation with a person. If I’ve had 12 exchanges already that day, I probably don’t need to include my signature so I can just quickly toggle that off. But generally, I do include that signature. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah, exactly. And that’s also a good thing for character count. So when little auto signature does take up a little bit, so you might as well use it for the first interaction, then you can toggle it off for the rest and give you more time to get your message across. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Love it. Okay. Tip number three here in the texting etiquette is keep it short. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Keep it short. So the great thing about texting is that you can get out a lot of information in a short text by being direct and sticking to the point. But there will be some times where you just need to get a longer message out. So Zipwhip has a new character limit of 600. It used to be 250. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Oh yeah. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. So it’s a nice little bump up there. So for those times when you just need a little bit more space to get the message across. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Gotcha. This might be a good moment to talk about we as a texting company, we’re not against emailing or calling customers, but can you tell us, go into that a little bit? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. Yeah. We really see texting as a supplement to email and to phone calls. We’re not interested in having people just get rid of that. And then just in texting, start texting for all of your communications. We really see texting as a way to get your customer’s attention. So say if you need to get on a phone call with someone, texting is a great way to just send a quick message that says, “Hey, are you available for a phone call tomorrow?” And that person can just say, “Yep, I’ll talk to you then.” Instead of playing phone tag or sending them an email about it, and then you have to go wait a couple days to get that confirmed. So it’s just a really great way to kick things off. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yeah. Yeah. And generally, texting is that place where people want to keep it short on both sides. Right? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Definitely, yeah. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

All right, keep it short. How about this next point? Reply quickly and keep the momentum. What do you mean by this? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yes. So reply quickly, keep the momentum going. Texting is a naturally rapid back and forth way to have a conversation. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Bing, bing, bing. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yep. Messages back and forth. Yep. Your customers will likely text you right away. And so you want to keep that momentum going and don’t sit on that message too long. People expect their messages to be replied to very quickly. So don’t wait too long to reply to messages. But of course you could be asking, “I can’t be available 24/7 to reply to my messages. What do I do then?” So we have auto replies. Auto replies is a great feature. If you’re out of office or maybe it’s after business hours, set up an auto reply message to let the customer know the reason you’re not texting back. “It’s after business hours, we got your text.” Or, “I’ll be out of the office.” And then you can also include that message to let them know when you’ll be able to get back to them. So it’s a good way to let them know that you’re still important to me, but I will get back to you at this time. So, yeah. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. Excellent. Excellent. Last but not least, this is maybe the most important question. 

Carlene Reyes: 

I’m so excited for it. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

That’s right. Yes, you can use emojis. Woohoo! 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yay for all the emojis. Yeah. So if you’re worried that emojis will seem unprofessional, don’t be. People love emojis. We all love emojis. And if you say you don’t love emojis, you’re lying. So Keith, do you love emojis? 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Well, I do. And I’ve added these emojis on this slide for the simple reason that these are my two favorite ones. I tend to use this guy with the glasses because I think he kind of looks like me. And then I tend to use that one a lot too, just to say yes, confirm, all that kind of stuff. So I definitely use those. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. So late last year, we surveyed consumers from the baby boomer generation all through Gen Z. And across the board, all generations were okay with emoji use from businesses as long as they were used in the appropriate context. So emojis are great. They keep things fun and they keep things light. Just use common sense and don’t overdo it. Don’t send an entire message in emoji like you would a friend. You don’t want your customer going, they’re like, “What? What are they saying?” Don’t try and be too fun. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. Good tips. We have covered a lot of content here and there’s even more in our ultimate guide that we’ve been talking about here, including a section on marketing your texting capabilities, letting your customers know that you do texting now. Including we also have some downloadable templates with some drag and drop elements that you can use that will help you start writing those texts or writing them in a better way. And we’re running short on time. I was going to have you engage. Okay. I’ll have you engage here. 

Carlene Reyes: 

I love the polls. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yeah. Okay. We can’t let this one go. I am curious after hearing this or after you’ve already been texting maybe in your business, we are curious to know what is the most important text use case for your business, in your opinion? There’s lots of different ways, including ones that aren’t listed here, besides scheduling and alerts, customer service, sales, billing, et cetera. There’s so many more innovative ways that people are doing. A couple more moments here and I’ll close this poll to see what people are doing out there or what they’re thinking. What do you think of this Carlene? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Very cool. Yeah. Yeah, that seems scheduling and alerts, customer service and support, huge, huge ones. There’s a lot of different ways that texting can be applied to those. So yeah. And if you do need any more ideas on how else you can use texting for business, you can check out our blog and we always have plenty of examples up there for everyone. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. Now we’re to the questions sections and we don’t have a lot of time. So drop your questions in there right now. We’ll get to as many as we can before we have to close this in a few minutes and we will do our best to, even if we aren’t able to answer them right now, we’ll do our best to follow up with you with an answer of some sort. So let’s dive in here. There’s a question came in that is are there specific acronyms that are used or shouldn’t be used when texting customers? 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. So this actually will tie back a little bit to our emoji use. From that same study, we did ask customers or we did ask consumers how they use acronyms in their day to day life with friends and family. What we found out, Gen X and baby boomers, they don’t really use it so much. Gen Z and millennials, of course, we’re all about the LOLs and OMGs. So I think this just goes to show know your audience. And if you do have a lot of Gen Xers, baby boomers that you’re interacting with, just consider if they’re not using acronyms on their day to day life, kind of stay away from it when you’re texting them. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

I just learned one today I never knew. BRB. You know BRB? 

Carlene Reyes: 

It’s be right back. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Anyway. I’m glad to know that now. Okay. Next question. Can a business do group texts or would you advise otherwise? 

Carlene Reyes: 

So group texts are a little different with business for texting than they are with personal texting. So personal texting group texts, you send out a message to a certain number of contacts, and then everyone can interact in that same message window. And everyone’s going to see the interactions and what’s going on. With business texting, it’s more so you can have groups of people. So say you’re in sales and you need to send up follow ups or something. You can send out a message to go out to a group, but everyone is going to see their own individualized message. So it’s not going to open up in the same window. It’ll just be as if you were sending them a message one-on-one. And so no one will be able to see those interactions. And it’s just a much better way to keep you organized. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yeah. That makes sense. It’s as if you’re sending a BCC, a Blind CC in an email when you’re sending out a group text. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah. Yeah, definitely. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. I think we have time for one more question, and then we should close this. Again, we’ll try to follow up with all of the rest of your questions here. Currently, in your opinion, do you think, as a business, it is best to include your personal name and signature or just business name? What would clients prefer? 

Carlene Reyes: 

I would use a personal name. I mean, that’s part of texting. It’s a personal medium. You want to identify who you are. Carlene from Zipwhip sounds a lot more friendly than from Zipwhip. So you want to have that connection that you’re interacting with another person on the line. So I think it’s a great idea to use your personal name. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Okay. I agree. Okay. So we have to close up shop here, respecting your time out there. You’re busy people. And to do that, I will first say thank you to Carlene. Thank you so much for being here. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Thank you for having me. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

This was a wealth of information. Thank you for joining us. These don’t happen without your participation as well. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yes, thank you for joining, everyone. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

So we’re glad you’re joining us. And I want to, before we close, let you know a few things. One, that when I close this window or you close out of the webinar, a little survey is going to pop up. And as a thank you for engaging with that just for a minute or so, I’ll be sending you a link to the video recording and the slides that we showed today. So thanks for engaging with that. Want to let you know about another webinar that’s coming up on August 22nd. This is a texting for business ask me anything Q and A with a couple of our VPs around here. So they know a lot about texting both from several different angles. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Yeah, it’s going to be a fun one. 

Keith Hitchcock: 

Yeah. Tune into that. If you want to be notified about that, be sure to sign up on our blog list. So we’ve been mentioning all these lists. In the followup email that I’ll be sending to everyone, you’ll get a link to the ultimate guide if you haven’t gotten it yet, a link to sign up for the blog, what else? The ebook for the TCPA. I’ll give you a link to the free trial if you’re interested in giving our app a try. Anyway, all the useful links that I can think of I will include in that email. So thanks again for joining us. We look forward to seeing you next time. And have a good rest of your day. 

Carlene Reyes: 

Bye, everyone. 

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